Most Visually Striking Films on Netflix

hero on netflix

Moving Art (Also on UK Netflix) (2014)

A visual musing on the wondrous beauty of the natural world, told through hypnotic time-lapse sequences. Read our review.

American Horror Story (Also on UK Netflix)

The highly stylised horror series is exquisitely grotesque. Though it is a thoroughly engrossing watch, I do wonder if the macabre blend of gore and glamour will stand the test of time.

 Cave of Forgotten Dreams (2010)

A visual poem from legendary auteur Werner Herzog, which explores the nature of time and existence with Herzog’s keen sense of visual wonder (read our review of Cave of Forgotten Dreams).

Hero (2002)

Strong colours are used to dazzling effect throughout this film’s surreal exploration of ancient China, lingering long afterwards in the memory.

 

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Featured Image Credit: Still from Hero (2002). Design by On Netflix Now

Moving Art Series

moving art netflix

Oceans:

Duration: 25 min

Director: Louie Schwartberg

Flowers:

Duration: 25 min

Director: Louie Schwartberg

Deserts:

Duration: 25 min

Director: Louis Schwartzberg

 4/5 
Schwartzberg makes splendid use of optics. Throughout the film, one is keenly aware of the interplay between light and dark.

There is no particular narrative to the Moving Art (2014) series, other than the grand narrative that sustains all life in the known Universe.

Moving Art serenely observes these phenomena in six exquisite short films entitled: Oceans, Deserts, Forests, Flowers, Waterfalls and Underwater.

The concept is simple, but deeply moving. Each film contains spectacular footage of the natural world set to instrumental music, shot in various locations, all over America.

It truly is a Zen experience, and I highly recommend watching this if you are in an anxious or stressful mood. The pure, sumptuous beauty of Moving Art will soothe those troubled feelings.

Oceans: Director Louie Schwartzberg captures the fury and turbulence of the sea and its waves, contrasting it with the deep calm of interior lakes and ponds. One cannot help but be reminded of the tumult of human emotions, which so closely resemble the fluidity of water.

Forests: There is truly an abundance of colour and texture in this film, comprising a collection of woodland scenes. There is something mystical about Forests, particularly the shots of dense thickets under bright, starry skies.

Flowers: Schwartzberg uses time-lapse (he is an expert in the field) to show the full life cycle of the flora featured in the film. Flowers is evocative and full of colour and life; indeed, the images in this film provoke deep contemplation about time and creation.

Deserts: Schwartzberg makes splendid use of optics. Throughout the film, one is keenly aware of the interplay between light and dark. The stark subject matter makes Deserts more minimalistic than the other two films, and perhaps a little more subtle too.

Waterfalls are incredibly beautiful yet terrifying forces of nature. Waterfalls, the short Moving Art film, captures the force and power they generate.

Underwater travels to the depths of the sea to record the plethora of plant, fish and mammalian life that exists there. Some of the most magnificent scenes are those that show the size and grace of humpback whales, the ocean’s giants.

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Also see: Samsara